Keyword

Management education accreditation innovation score cards

Abstract

Management education accreditation is an industry in need of restructuring. Highly concentrated accreditation organizations in the United States and Europe are preserving decades old criteria. Those decades old criteria reflect the state of the industry in different times. Things have changed and with them the very nature of management education and, in no less measure, the monitoring and accreditation norms. . The industry suffers from conceptual and operational flaws. The need for restructuring is evident. The article provides a review of the structure of the industry today. This is followed by an analysis of the conceptual and operational weakness of the existing frameworks. A possible substitute based on systems and metrics analysis is then explored. Multiple metric-rooted performance parameters provide an overall assessment and lead to an Accreditation Score Card. Accreditation Score Cards could have tangible impact on the practice of management program, and institution, accreditation process and the assessment of scope, content, approach and effectiveness of management education efforts.


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